Posted by: Chris Maloney | February 21, 2013

Weight Gain: The Connection Between The Sugars You Eat and the Hormones You Produce.

Fructose Junkie

Fructose Junkie (Photo credit: misternaxal)

In another review of the state of the American stomach, the experts have resolved that we eat too much. Too much sugar, to be specific.

Too much high fructose corn syrup, to be exact, but they’re blaming fructose in general now. What does this sugar do? “consumption of fructose has been shown to increase visceral adipose deposition and de novo lipogenesis (DNL), produce dyslipidemia, and decrease insulin sensitivity in older, overweight/obese subjects” (abstract below).

In English, that means eating things with lots of high fructose corn syrup (which is dirt cheap and added to all fast foods) increases body fat stores. It tells your body to make more fat cells, unbalances your good fat/bad fat ratio (lecture on LDL vs. HDL lipids, anyone?) and makes your body cells not want to take in sugar.

When your cells don’t want to take in sugar, you get increased sugar in your blood. When that sugar in your blood reaches the magic number of 126, you have diabetes. But before it reaches that magic number the extra sugar may bind to your red blood cells, making it impossible for them to do their jobs and giving you problems like blindness and kidney failure.

Gosh, I know the Pop Tarts don’t look so good now. But it isn’t that you can never have sugar, it’s that sugar should not make up 25% of what you eat. That’s currently allowed, and today’s paper says that the average adult gets 11% of his or her daily calories from fast food.

Let’s shorten this up. When all you eat is dessert (which includes any food processed by some manufacturer rather than at home) you will have problems over time. If you eat mostly good, healthy food, your body will not get that bad.

If you are already in a bind, switching to good, healthy food is a good idea, but won’t necessarily reverse the hormonal changes in your body. For that, you need to reverse the hormonal changes in your body. How do we do that? Well, it involves working directly with those hormones and shouldn’t really be based on calorie restriction as that makes the body more resistant over time.

Annu Rev Med. 2012;63:329-43. doi: 10.1146/annurev-med-042010-113026. Epub  2011 Oct 27.

Role of fructose-containing sugars in the epidemics of obesity and metabolic syndrome.

Source

Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, California, USA. klstanhope@ucdavis.edu

Abstract

There is controversy concerning the role of sugar in the epidemics of obesity and metabolic syndrome. There is less controversy concerning the effects of fructose on components of metabolic syndrome; consumption of fructose has been shown to increase visceral adipose deposition and de novo lipogenesis (DNL), produce dyslipidemia, and decrease insulin sensitivity in older, overweight/obese subjects. This review examines the potential mechanisms of these effects of fructose and considers whether these mechanisms are relevant to the effects of consuming sucrose or high-fructose corn syrup. Evidence demonstrating that the commonly consumed sugars increase visceral adipose deposition, DNL, and insulin insensitivity is limited or inconclusive. Evidence that sugar consumption promotes development of an unfavorable lipid profile is strong and suggests that the upper added sugar consumption limit of 25% of energy or less, suggested in the Report of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010, may merit re-evaluation.

PMID: 22034869
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